CEO & Seniors Advocate Discuss “Seniors Care For A Change” On Air

We need to make sure that in providing care, that it is what we call person centered care or patient centered and that people have some flexibility and adaptability.

In July of 2014. BC Care Providers Association released its Seniors Care for a Change report. Since its release, the report has experienced hundreds of views and downloads from the BCCPA website. The report has also garnered  attention from the Ministry of Health, BC Health Authorities, and the media. Just a day after its release, Seniors Care for a Change made headlines as the front page article on the Vancouver Sun, and became a hot topic in various online blogging discussions.

isobel-mackenzieOver the past several months, the report has triggered a discussion regarding red tape and unnecessary regulations in the continuing care sector. Since its release last summer, the report continues to dominate a number of media and industry conversations. The report was also featured as the key story in a segment on CBC’s The Early Edition with Rick Cluff. BC’s Seniors Advocate, Isobel Mackenzie, joined Cluff as special guest to provide insight into the issues cataloged within the report.

“I think it is a good report,” said Mackenzie. “Some of the highlights I have been hearing from residents, from family members, and from care providers and clinicians is about the amount of time that is spent dealing with administrative work versus time that they are able to spend with clients, with patients, and with family members.”

“We need to make sure that in providing care, that it is what we call person-centered care or patient centered and that people have some flexibility and adaptability.”

What happens with a system wide rule is that it doesn’t always support person-centered care, so you end up creating the lowest common denominator for everyone

Following the CBC segment, BCCPA CEO, Daniel Fontaine went live on air with Bill Good on CKNW’s The Bill Good Show, to discuss the findings of the report. During the broadcast, callers phoned in to pose questions and voice their own experiences with red tape in the sector.

Within the report a specific case referenced a resident, Linda, who has always loved to enjoy a piece of lemon cake after her meal because it is her favourite dessert. Linda explained how dessert brings joy and decadence to her life, however care aides at this particular facility had to refuse her the cake in order to adhere to nutrition regulations. The unnecessary red tape restricting the care aides to provide Linda with a simple piece of lemon cake is a result of system wide rules that do not cater to individualized and person centered care.

“What happens with a system wide rule is that it doesn’t always support person-centered care,” said Fontaine. “So you end up creating the lowest common denominator for everyone.”

To hear recording of both interviews, see below. To read the full Seniors Care for a Change report, click here.

 

Isobel Mackenzie, BC Seniors Advocate on The Early Edition with Rick Cluff.

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Daniel Fontaine, CEO on The Bill Good Show with Bill Good

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Daniel Fontaine, CEO CFAX The Drive with Terry Moore

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