Making the Case for “Frailty” Measurement Vs Per Capita Funding

Per capita health funding is unfair, argue John Muscedere and Samir Sinha in their essay posted at Troy Media. By using the measure of individual frailty, they say Canada is better able to target spending where it is most needed. They use the following example:

john-samir“Consider an individual in their 60s with multiple medical problems requiring repeated use of the health system compared to a healthy octogenarian with few or no health problems.

“In a recent review in the Canadian Journal of Aging, along with our colleagues, we highlight frailty as an essential concept that needs more attention in order to direct precious health-care dollars efficiently – and to provide the right care at the right time to the right populations.”

Frailty, they say is a better determinant of outcomes and health-care utilization than age alone.

“Our health system came into existence when people generally died younger and more commonly with of a single illness. As well, many more of us lived in intergenerational households or close to relatives who provided help for living independently.

“Jump forward several decades and our health system scrambles to meet the needs of older individuals with multiple simultaneous and often inter-related health and social issues that threaten their independence – the essence of frailty.”

Read more from their article and as well their bios at Troy Media.