Profile: Home Support Services Worker Bryce Walker

Bryce Walker has worked in Home Support for the last 10 years. He considers his role small when you compare it to those providing the front line care like the Health Care Assistants and Community Health Workers. He is a Senior Clerk for Home Support Services of the Fraser Health Authority. He describes it as mostly administrative, as well as providing education, support and supervision to our community health workers and scheduling staff. But meanwhile knowing that he is playing a productive role in helping the people of the community and that in some small way, he is giving back.

Bryce Walker works home support services senior clerk

“I have always known that I wanted to work in a field that community focused. Home Support allows me to not only work in seniors care but for a diverse group that includes: younger people, those with developmental disability, short term acute care needs and those with a palliative prognosis as well as seniors.”

Bryce focuses on ensuring that those providing the care have everything they need while providing continuity of care for his clients. Over the years there has been an increase to the volume of clients as well as the acuity of their care needs which is a top priority.

“I think the biggest perk is getting to know our clients, so many of them have lived incredible lives, or during incredible events in history, I love learning from our clients…The biggest perk for me is when a client takes the time to write us a letter or a poem, sometimes it is the fuel to keep going!”

Bryce’s clients are a diverse group; the large majority are people who without home care services would not be able to live at home independently or semi-independently.

“I think the work we do is important because it keeps people at home. You will hear many providers of home support talk about “Home is Best”. I believe in this very much. The longer people can be at home in a comfortable and familiar surrounding the healthier they can be, from both a physical and mental health perspective. This also allows for primary care facilities to have the time and resources to provide proper care for the people who require those services.”

According to Bryce, over the years the industry has seen changes. The volume of clients has increased largely because of philosophies like “home is best”. Over the last 10 years there is a greater number of people qualifying and accessing homecare services. There has also been a lot of change in technology.

“To think that Home Support scheduling was at one time done on paper rather than computer is almost unthinkable. Care providers continue to access the latest technological advances to assist with greater efficiencies in the healthcare system, as well as providing more responsive care to our clients.” jackiebakerphoto

Bryce believes that mentoring is an important part of our healthcare system. He has benefited greatly from the knowledge and experiences of others. Mentoring is something he likes to provide to his colleagues. Making his role to help educate and ensure they have the tools and resources needed to ensure the best quality care happens.

When not working Bryce is a big hockey fan and he is also involved in his son’s Minor Hockey association. He enjoys giving his time to community groups and volunteering. His original career aspiration was to be in politics affecting positive social change within his community and heralds Jack Layton as his role model.

The biggest perk for me is when a client takes the time to write us a letter or a poem, sometimes it is the fuel to keep going

“I would have to say Jack Layton, and not even for his politics… He was a genuine person, with a sense of responsibility, who was not afraid to take action in all the things that he faced. He was a great problem solver – and mostly because he took action to solve the issues rather than just talk about them.”

With his aspirations to grow and develop within healthcare, pursue further education and help tackle some of the challenges within the system, Bryce keeps his words to live by simple but clear.

“I think mostly that each day is a privilege, not guarantee – so live it up, and make a difference.”

 – Written by freelance writer Angie Holubowich for the Seniors Care HR Planning Committee. Funding for this project was provided by the Canada-British Columbia Labour Market Development Agreement